Exec Survey: Obama Will Win, Tech Economy Will Lose

US President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney following their first debate. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images via @daylife)

A new survey shows a large majority of technology leaders thinks President Obama will win re-election. But by a somewhat smaller but still large margin, they think Republican challenger Mitt Romney would be better for the technology economy.

Those are the chief results of a survey conducted recently and released today by the law firm DLA Piper at its technology summit today in Menlo Park, Calif. They may not be particularly surprising, but the margin by which the tech executives assume another four years of Obama is likely seems striking–especially with Romney possibly gaining support in Silicon Valley.

Even as they believe Romney would be better for their businesses, their widespread assumption of an Obama victory suggests they’re opting not to engage in wishful thinking. (To be clear, however, there could be some selection bias, since only 220 executives out of 5,000 who were sent the survey responded.)

But the clear majority do wish Romney would pull off a come-from-behind victory. Some 60% said they’re skeptical that a second Obama administration would be positive for the technology business. That’s a complete reverse of their feelings four years ago, when 60% thought Obama would be better for tech than Republican John McCain. However, a separate question about whether executives agreed with the statement that Obama would be positive for the tech industry revealed that 42% did, while 21% were neutral. …

Read the complete survey results at The New Persuaders.

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How Steve Jobs’ Laughable Early Apple Ads Evolved Into Today’s Marketing Marvels

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

To look at Apple’s classic advertisements, from the stark, bold “Think Different” campaign to the playful “Get a Mac” series to those minimalist silhouetted iPod ads, you’d never guess that early Apple ads were so–not to put too fine a point on it–awful.

On the one-year anniversary of Apple cofounder Steve Jobs’ untimely death, we scrounged up a baker’s dozen of early Apple ads in the accompanying photo gallery for your amusement and edification. They’re print ads in particular, since it was pretty early days to be advertising computers on television. Still, most them wouldn’t be recognizable as Apple ads if not for the name and early logos.

They weren’t especially worse than other computer ads at the time. Maybe they were even marginally better. But they were anything but special, let alone cool.

What’s interesting is not just that Apple’s early ads look so depressingly conventional. It’s that a few of them revealed flashes of Jobs’ future marvels of marketing. Once Jobs got past the initial “speeds and feeds” marketing imperative during a time when Apple was really just one, albeit prominent, competitor in a sea of pre-Windows, pre-Mac personal computer makers, he began to develop an eye for brand marketing that few companies in technology or any other industry have since surpassed.

Take a close look at these early ads, and you can see that Apple’s evolution to the pinnacle of brand marketing happened not in a straight line, but in a sort of punctuated equilibrium that parallels the gradual maturing of computing itself. At first, PCs were for hobbyists interested in performance and features, and the ads reflected that. But as the machines began to sell into the millions, Apple’s ads began to emphasize how they were “the computer for the rest of us,” as the first Macintosh ads called them.

That first one for the Apple-1 in 1976, rivetingly entitled “A Balance of Features,” was appallingly amateurish. The ad, released only a few months after Jobs and Steve Wozniak showed the prototype at the Homebrew Computer Club in SiliconValley and incorporated their company, was stuffed full of technical features in a way that’s unimaginable today. For instance, the ad touted the ability to attach a keyboard and monitor to allow “the efficient entry and examination of programs in hexidecimal notation.” Who knew?

There was even a misspelling in the first line, a sign that Jobs’ famous perfectionism hadn’t quite kicked in yet. …

Read the complete post, including a photo gallery of the ads, at The New Persuaders.

Experts Trump Friends (And Facebook) For Advice On Buying Tech Products

Problem for Facebook and Twitter?

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

To hear Facebook tell it, its Sponsored Stories, which let marketers tap people’s comments or “likes” of products to create an ad for their friends, are the future of advertising. And they’re apparently doing quite well for the social network.

But when it comes to technology products in particular, which account for more than a fifth of online advertising, friends, social networks, and even any kind of advertising all rank well below articles by experts in the field when it comes to consumers researching what to buy. That’s according to a recent survey by tech blog network NetShelter Technology Media, for which audience tracker Crowd Science polled more than 1,000 people on 74 tech blogs such as 9to5Mac, Crackberry.com, and MacRumors.

Some tidbits from the survey:

* 85% of respondents said the most useful and influential online content when they’re considering buying tech products are articles, reviews, blog posts, and videos by experts. That’s far more than 35% who cited brand content, 33% who trust family and friends, and just 6% who are most influenced by advertising.

* 70% of people said they don’t turn to Facebook, Twitter, or other social media when they want to buy a tech product. Only 9% consult a Facebook brand page, 4% consider brand “likes,” and 8% pay attention to likes or recommendations from Facebook friends.

* Email is the preferred way 69% of people like to share articles and reviews, while 37% use Facebook, 15% use Twitter, and 20% use LinkedIn. …

Read the complete post at The New Persuaders.

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