The Mythical iTV: Steve Jobs’ Marketing Magic Is Still Alive And Well At Apple

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

Image representing Steve Jobs as depicted in C...

Image via CrunchBase

Another day, another rumor that an Apple television may be coming.

Another recycled rumor, in fact. The Wall Street Journal reported this morning that China’s Foxconn, a major Apple supplier, is helping Apple test some prototypes for a large-screen television set. That follows similar (OK, identical) rumors a couple of days ago, last August, last May, and last December saying that Apple was enlisting Chinese suppliers to create an Apple TV set.

No surprise here, given that Apple CEO Tim Cook managed to stoke the fires of speculation last week by saying the company has “intense interest” in television. Of course, Cook himself said the very same thing last May, too.

So don’t hold your breath for an Apple TV that goes beyond the current Apple TV hockey puck. Even longtime Apple television forecaster Gene Munster at Piper Jaffray now says it won’t come before next November. And even then, it’s debatable how important a product it will be, since it’s widely assumed that Apple can’t add much to the current TV experience without deals to get access to live TV shows, or at least win the right to revamp the TV user interface to encompass the full range of pay-TV and Internet content available today. And those deals are nowhere in sight just yet.

But the new flurries of interest in the mythical machine point up something that should reassure Apple investors, at least: Apple cofounder Steve Jobs’ famous marketing magic is still at work at the company more than a year after his death.

Some investors have been worried about whether Cook, by all accounts an ace operations guy but not a showman like Jobs (as no one else really is, honestly), can keep Apple’s brand as blindingly shiny as it has been for so many years now. It’s time to give Cook credit for faithfully following Jobs’ playbook: Let fans wax on about how desirable a new Apple product will be, building demand to a fever pitch so that whatever comes out is guaranteed to get unparalleled attention. Indeed, a recent survey says they’re already willing to pay considerably more for an Apple TV–whatever it turns out to be.

No, Cook doesn’t yet deserve to be considered a master marketer like Jobs. But he’s off to a pretty good start.

About these ads

Would You Buy An Apple Television?

AppleTV interface includes video, music, photo...

Apple TV interface includes video, music, photographs, and other Internet content (Photo: Wikipedia)

I’ve been intrigued lately by the idea of Apple making a TV. Not that Apple TV streaming-media hockey puck that Apple still calls a “hobby,” but a real television set. It’s something that every Apple fan, investor, and analyst seems to be expecting, or at least hoping for, because, well, who else is better positioned to fix the mess that is television programming today than Apple?

But what do people really want in a next-generation television? I’m hoping I can get some guidance from you–meaning real people who might buy the thing. So I’ve got a few short questions for anybody’s who’s interested:

* Would you buy an Apple television?

* If so, why? What would you like to see it do that current HDTVs don’t have?

* More specifically, is there anything that annoys you about the way television viewing works today? The current cable TV packages, program guides, remote controls, lack of current shows available online, anything else?

Feel free to comment here, of course, but I’d be especially interested in a brief conversation by phone or email with anyone who has an idea of what they’d like to see in an Apple television. So if you don’t mind spending a few minutes on the phone this week, email me at robert.hof@gmail.com with contact info and I’ll get in touch. Thanks!

The Long-Awaited Boxee Box Gets a Hollywood Preview

Few consumer electronics devices have been more widely anticipated, at least by the more geeky set, than Boxee‘s settop box for bringing Internet content to the TV–since Google TV debuted three weeks ago, anyway. The uniquely shaped Boxee Box will debut on Nov. 10 in New York, adding a potent new player to the rapidly expanding market for Internet-connected TVs and add-on devices.

Today, Boxee CEO Avner Ronen offered a preview at the Streaming Media West conference in Los Angeles, where such devices are viewed with much more wariness and even fear than in Silicon Valley. First, he offered his version of the landscape (paraphrased at times):

Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 87 other followers