Google Cuts ‘Fat Finger’ Accidental Clicks On Mobile Ads

gmobileadFrom my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

Advertisers have long known about a problem with mobile ads: fat fingers.

That is, people accidentally click an ad on those little smartphone screens thanks to clumsy digits (or purposely big or hard-to-avoid ads). Realizing their mistake, they back up instantly, but the advertiser gets charged while getting only a wisp of attention from a consumer they probably didn’t want to reach anyway. Today, Google is introducing a tweak to in-app image ads that should reduce those unintentional clicks considerably.

It’s a big issue. Recent studies indicate that up to about 40% of mobile ad clicks are accidental or even fraudulent, based on the fact that people “view” the ad two seconds or less. The result, of course, is not only that advertisers get charged even though consumers had no interest in the ad, but that they obviously aren’t going to end up buying the product or service.

This may be one reason advertisers pay much less per impression for mobile ads. And that’s a problem that has investors concerned about every company from Google and Facebook to a raft of mobile and app startups, as more and more online activity moves from stationary computers to smartphones and tablets.

Google found most of the accidental clicks on app image ads happened at the outer edges of the ad, no doubt because people were trying to scroll up or click on adjacent content. So now, Google has added a prompt to “Visit site” whenever people click on the outskirts of the ad. It’s an extra click, but it also ensures that’s really what the person wanted to do. …

Read the rest of the post at The New Persuaders.

About these ads

Here Are The Top 20 Ads You Actually Chose To Watch On YouTube This Year

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

 

A big reason YouTube has been on a roll lately, due to hit $3.6 billion in gross sales this year, is its TrueView ads that advertisers pay for only if people view them at least 30 seconds. At least 65% of ads inside videos use this format now.

So what did people choose to watch this year? YouTube this morning revealed the top 20 most popular ads of 2012. The YouTube Ads Leaderboard was chosen based on what the Google video unit thinks are the most potent signals of viewer choice – the ad’s number of views, how much of it people chose to watch, and the percentage of non-ad views, with all of the ads here eliciting at least as many “organic” views as paid.

What’s most striking about the ads, which range from repurposed TV ads to spots created just for YouTube, is the popularity of the longer-form commercials. Many of the top ads are five minutes long or more.

The message: Create an ad that’s good enough, and the supposed short attention span of online viewers vanishes.

Here’s the complete list, with links for easy viewing:

1. Nike “My Time Is Now
13. Old Spice “Old Spice | Blown Mind
14. Old Spice “Old Spice | Bounce
19. Old Spice “Old Spice | Bed
20. Old Spice “Old Spice | Vending Machine

Here’s A New Way You’ll Soon Get Targeted For Ads: Your Hashtags

Screen shot 2012-12-11 at 8.17.52 PMFrom my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

Facebook has Sponsored Stories. Twitter has Promoted Tweets. Buzzfeed has Promoted Posts. They’re all based on social gestures and activities, each targeted to people, whether friends or birds of a feather, who might share similar interests. Now, a company has come up with a new way of targeting people using one of the most common social gestures of our time: the hashtag.

If you’re bothering to read this, you probably already know hashtags are those short subject labels, starting with a # or hash sign, that describe the topic a tweet or other shared item is about. They didn’t start with Twitter, but they became popular thanks to their common use in tweets. That use has spread to other social networks, from Pinterest to Instagram (though not very often on Facebook, for some reason).

Today, social ad firm RadiumOne announced it’s making hashtag targeting available to advertisers so they can reach like-minded consumers in real-time across the Web based on the hashtags they’re using. So, for example, says RadiumOne founder and CEO Gurbaksh Chahal, Nike can reach consumers who use the hashtag #nike, or #olympics, or #fitness with ads for running shoes. Or McDonald’s could target people who tag their tweet or Instagram photo #burgers or even #hungry. …

Read the complete post at The New Persuaders.

 

Here’s Why Facebook Likes Microsoft’s Atlas Ad Server

fbthumbsupFrom my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

After spending years trying to dump its Atlas online ad-serving business, Microsoft reportedly is in talks with Facebook to sell the unit that helps advertisers and ad agencies place ads on websites and track their impact.

The news comes five months after Microsoft wrote down nearly the entire value of its $6.3 billion acquisition of aQuantive, of which Atlas was a part. Following its recent move to de-emphasize its own ad tech, Microsoft has been shopping the unit around, most recently to AppNexus. Business Insider reports that before Facebook talks began, the highest bid Atlas got was $30 million.

There’s no guarantee the deal will happen. But why is Facebook interested? Some speculate that it’s a way for Facebook to close the final technology gap on a plan for an ad network, similar to Google’s AdSense, that would place Facebook ads on other websites. Could be. But I tend to agree with one AppNexus Senior VP that there’s an even bigger goal that goes along with that: proving Facebook ads work.

That has been the No. 1 social network’s overriding task for the past year, especially since its underwhelming IPO. It has released vollies of case studies showing how its ads actually do spur sales down the line. But for whatever reason, most likely the difficulty of applying success by one company or industry with its social ads to others, many advertisers and agencies remain skeptical.

Atlas would enable Facebook to track the impact of its ads, which it’s already quantifying through a deal with Datalogix, which tracks in-store sales, not just on Facebook but on other websites as well. Privacy advocates are not happy about the Datalogix deal, and adding an Atlas-powered ad network won’t make them any happier.

But Facebook may finally be on the verge of closing the elusive loop between its ads and ultimate sales that result from them in a way that to date no one but Google has done really well and on a huge scale.

No Brand Shakedown, Says Facebook–Here’s How Page Posts Reach Fans (Or Don’t)

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

A lot of businesses with Facebook pages are up in arms about their posts showing up in their fans’ news feeds way less often lately. They and their ad agencies think Facebook did it deliberately to force them to buy ads to promote those posts, and they’re not shy about telling the world about it.

Facebook says it did change its EdgeRank algorithm, which decides based on various criteria which posts individual Facebook users see in their news feeds, in September, chiefly to help reduce spam messages. But the No. 1 social network, which has been intensifying its efforts to boost ad sales following a disappointing IPO last May and a swoon in its share price, categorically denies that it’s essentially blackmailing brands into buying ads by reducing their reach with fans. In fact, it says posts are showing up overall at about the same 16% they’ve been for awhile now.

Indeed, it has just opened up a new news feed option that runs only posts from pages you’ve “liked.” The move won the approval of Mark Cuban, whose anger in one tweet catapulted the issue into the public eye. But lots of questions remain.

Today, the company is trying to get the word out about how its system works with a “whiteboard lunch” for the press, with the aim of explaining how page posts find their way into news feeds. I’ll cover the highlights here starting about noon Pacific time, so refresh until about 1:15 p.m. for the latest. It’s pretty casual, not a formal presentation, so most of this will be a little scattered, but potentially useful to marketers.

Will Cathcart, product manager for news feed, comes on first to tell how Facebook thinks about the news feed. On an actual whiteboard! He says Facebook tries to figure out how interested you will be (Yoda, in his example) in each page post. If he comments on or shares or likes (or “hides”), say, posts from the Rebel Alliance, those will show up more often. But if he reacts in a significant way to a post by, say, Vader, that will inform future visibility of Vader’s posts. If he often complains that posts from, say, the Empire, those posts may drop out of his news feed entirely. …

Read the complete post at The New Persuaders.

Did The Bubble In Facebook Ad Startups Just Pop?

A little crowded, perhaps? (Source: LUMA Partners)

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

For much of this year, hundreds of little and not-so-little startups that help businesses run advertisements on Facebook have been playing the M&A game, buying rivals or related companies, getting acquired by bigger firms, or both. But the acquisitions were sometimes for big bucks, fueling a sense that the opportunities were huge for social marketing startups.

It’s not hard to find social marketing firms still thriving, but suddenly it’s looking a little more like a game of musical chairs. And while it would be easy (and wrong) to say the music has stopped, it’s becoming clear that a chunk of those firms will find themselves without a seat as the social media biz starts to mature and its growth chart no longer looks like a straight line up and to the right.

The recent struggles of Facebook and other social media firms such as Zynga aren’t new, of course. They prompted some folks to wonder if the social media bubble had popped a couple of months ago. But it appears now that advertiser uncertainty about social media is starting to hit the still-crowded ecosystem of social media marketing and ad firms.

Today, Salesforce.com laid off about 100 people from two social-media acquisitions, Radian6 and Buddy Media. Although it may not be surprising given likely job overlaps–and the fact that Buddy was losing big bucks before the sale–the layoff suggests that the market for social ads isn’t big enough to accommodate all the players that have sprung up in recent years, or at least all the employees working for them.

Read the complete post at The New Persuaders.

Facebook: Yes, Our Ads Work, Chapter 16

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

Facebook has spent much of the past year furiously trying to persuade skeptical brand marketers that ads on its service work. In particular, it wants brands with large fan bases on Facebook not to assume that–like General Motors apparently did when it pulled its Facebook ads just before the No. 1 social network’s May IPO–they can simply post stuff to their Facebook pages and call it a day.

Its latest salvo: A new report conducted with market researcher comScore that tries to quantify the impact of paid ads vs. “organic” brand page content.

Some highlights from the report, which includes case studies of Samsung Mobile and two unnamed “major” brands, a retailer and a financial services firm:

• Leading brands on Facebook can use paid media to extend their total brand reach beyond the reach they achieve using organic media alone. Among a selection of 100 top brand pages on Facebook, those using paid media reach an audience that is on average 5.3 times larger than organic audience alone, and 5.4 times greater than the total audience of top brand pages using no paid media with a similarly sized fan base. …

Read all the details at The New Persuaders.

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