Here’s Why Facebook Likes Microsoft’s Atlas Ad Server

fbthumbsupFrom my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

After spending years trying to dump its Atlas online ad-serving business, Microsoft reportedly is in talks with Facebook to sell the unit that helps advertisers and ad agencies place ads on websites and track their impact.

The news comes five months after Microsoft wrote down nearly the entire value of its $6.3 billion acquisition of aQuantive, of which Atlas was a part. Following its recent move to de-emphasize its own ad tech, Microsoft has been shopping the unit around, most recently to AppNexus. Business Insider reports that before Facebook talks began, the highest bid Atlas got was $30 million.

There’s no guarantee the deal will happen. But why is Facebook interested? Some speculate that it’s a way for Facebook to close the final technology gap on a plan for an ad network, similar to Google’s AdSense, that would place Facebook ads on other websites. Could be. But I tend to agree with one AppNexus Senior VP that there’s an even bigger goal that goes along with that: proving Facebook ads work.

That has been the No. 1 social network’s overriding task for the past year, especially since its underwhelming IPO. It has released vollies of case studies showing how its ads actually do spur sales down the line. But for whatever reason, most likely the difficulty of applying success by one company or industry with its social ads to others, many advertisers and agencies remain skeptical.

Atlas would enable Facebook to track the impact of its ads, which it’s already quantifying through a deal with Datalogix, which tracks in-store sales, not just on Facebook but on other websites as well. Privacy advocates are not happy about the Datalogix deal, and adding an Atlas-powered ad network won’t make them any happier.

But Facebook may finally be on the verge of closing the elusive loop between its ads and ultimate sales that result from them in a way that to date no one but Google has done really well and on a huge scale.

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