Jeff Bezos: How Amazon Web Services Is Just Like The Kindle Business

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

Amazon Web Services, which provides computing and storage services to hundreds of businesses, began as a seemingly crazy idea in 2006, but it has since grown into a $1.5 billion business this year,  according to a new report from R.W. Baird. It’s believed to be one of Amazon.com’s fastest-growing businesses, the largest piece of an “other” revenue category that grew 68% in the third quarter, to $648 million, far outpacing overall company revenue growth of 27%.

Today, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos offered an explanation of how AWS, often seen as something that has little to do with its core retail operation, fits into Amazon’s business, and how it runs on similar principles. In fact, he says, it’s quite similar to Amazon’s Kindle business, where the company makes little money on the device but a lot more if it’s used–in that case to buy lots of books and movies.

Bezos made his comments, which were webcast early Thursday afternoon, to close the company’s first public conference on Amazon Web Services, a three-day geekfest that started Tuesday in Las Vegas. Following are his edited and sometimes paraphrased comments in conversation with Werner Vogels, Amazon’s chief technology officer, sometimes ranging well beyond AWS to entrepreneurship, rockets, and a humongous clock in the mountains of west Texas. (Unfortunately, he had nothing to say about Amazon’s surprisingly large ad business.) You can view the whole keynote here or click the video above.

Vogels: The last time you were onstage, at the Kindle Fire announcement, you said that Amazon should only win when our customers win, and that’s how the Kindle Fire business works. I’d like to think AWS also works that way, but elaborate on that.

Bezos: It’s very similar to our Kindle device business. We sell our hardware near break-even, so we make money when people USE the device, not when they BUY the device. That is very aligning with customers. It causes us to have the right behaviors.

AWS is very similar. It’s a pay-as-you-go service. We’re not incented to get people to overpay for hardware. In the long run, that will work out very well for customers, and it will work out very well for Amazon.

Vogels: You’ve always talked about flywheels, which in Amazon retail is low prices, convenience, etc. What’s the flywheel in AWS?

Bezos: I always get the question, what’s going to change in 1o years? I almost never get asked, what’s NOT going to change in the next 10 years? That’s the more important question, because you can build a business around things that are stable. One is low prices. Another is faster delivery. Vast selection.

On AWS, the big ideas are also pretty straightforward. People will want more reliability, lower prices, etc. The big ideas in business are often very obvious. But it’s hard to keep a firm grasp of the obvious.

Vogels: What are the real mechanisms of innovation?

Bezos: Innovation is a point of view. You have to select people that want to innovate, to explore. An explorer company isn’t for everybody. But for people who get up in the morning and want to change things, it’s a lot of fun.

Other things important for innovation isn’t as fun. One is you have to have a willingness to fail, to be misunderstood for long periods of time. Then, you can ramp up your rate of experimentation. Successful invention requires you to increase your rate of experimentation. AWS is one of those things that helps startups do experimentation faster. …

Read the complete post at The New Persuaders.

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