No Brand Shakedown, Says Facebook–Here’s How Page Posts Reach Fans (Or Don’t)

From my Forbes.com blog The New Persuaders:

A lot of businesses with Facebook pages are up in arms about their posts showing up in their fans’ news feeds way less often lately. They and their ad agencies think Facebook did it deliberately to force them to buy ads to promote those posts, and they’re not shy about telling the world about it.

Facebook says it did change its EdgeRank algorithm, which decides based on various criteria which posts individual Facebook users see in their news feeds, in September, chiefly to help reduce spam messages. But the No. 1 social network, which has been intensifying its efforts to boost ad sales following a disappointing IPO last May and a swoon in its share price, categorically denies that it’s essentially blackmailing brands into buying ads by reducing their reach with fans. In fact, it says posts are showing up overall at about the same 16% they’ve been for awhile now.

Indeed, it has just opened up a new news feed option that runs only posts from pages you’ve “liked.” The move won the approval of Mark Cuban, whose anger in one tweet catapulted the issue into the public eye. But lots of questions remain.

Today, the company is trying to get the word out about how its system works with a “whiteboard lunch” for the press, with the aim of explaining how page posts find their way into news feeds. I’ll cover the highlights here starting about noon Pacific time, so refresh until about 1:15 p.m. for the latest. It’s pretty casual, not a formal presentation, so most of this will be a little scattered, but potentially useful to marketers.

Will Cathcart, product manager for news feed, comes on first to tell how Facebook thinks about the news feed. On an actual whiteboard! He says Facebook tries to figure out how interested you will be (Yoda, in his example) in each page post. If he comments on or shares or likes (or “hides”), say, posts from the Rebel Alliance, those will show up more often. But if he reacts in a significant way to a post by, say, Vader, that will inform future visibility of Vader’s posts. If he often complains that posts from, say, the Empire, those posts may drop out of his news feed entirely. …

Read the complete post at The New Persuaders.

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